Kathrin Schumann

Fellowship
Rudolf Mößbauer Tenure Track

Institution
Technical University of Munich

Department
Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene

Focus Group
Engineering Immune Cells for Therapy

Short CV

Prof. Schumann studied Biochemistry at the University of Tübingen and obtained her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried. After a research stay at Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, she continued her research at the University of California San Francisco. In the labs of Alex Marson and Jeffrey Bluestone she developed CRISPR-engineering of primary human T cells. In 2018 she was appointed as a Rudolf Mößbauer Tenure Track Assistant Professor of “Engineering Immune Cells for Therapy” at the TUM School of Medicine.

Selected Awards

2016 DFG Research Fellowship

Research Interests

Prof. Kathrin Schumann´s research is focusing on cell engineering of human immune cells. She is using novel CRISPR technologies to ablate or modify genetic regions in human T cells to characterize their role in cellular function and stability. In the long-term this knowledge can potentially help to develop novel therapies for autoimmune disease and cancer.

Selected Publications

  • Rupp, Levi J.; Schumann, Kathrin; Roybal, Kole T.; Gate, Rachel E.; Ye, Chun J.; Lim, Wendell A.; Marson, Alexander: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated PD-1 disruption enhances anti-tumor efficacy of human chimeric antigen receptor T cells. Scientific Reports 7 (1), 2017.
  • Hultquist, Judd F.; Schumann, Kathrin; Woo, Jonathan M.; Manganaro, Lara; McGregor, Michael J.; Doudna, Jennifer; Simon, Viviana; Krogan, Nevan J.; Marson, Alexander: A Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Platform for Functional Genetic Studies of HIV-Host Interactions in Primary Human T Cells. Cell Reports 17 (5), 2016, 1438-1452.
  • Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander: Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 112 (33), 2015, 10437-10442.
  • Schumann, Kathrin; Lämmermann, Tim; Bruckner, Markus; Legler, Daniel F.; Polleux, Julien; Spatz, Joachim P.; Schuler, Gerold; Förster, Reinhold; Lutz, Manfred B.; Sorokin, Lydia; Sixt, Michael: Immobilized Chemokine Fields and Soluble Chemokine Gradients Cooperatively Shape Migration Patterns of Dendritic Cells. Immunity 32 (5), 2010, 703-713.